Polish Potato Dumplings with Plums {Knedle ze Śliwkami}

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Polish Potato Dumplings with Plums {Knedle ze Śliwkami}

Here is yet another dumpling joining the Polish dumpling family (see recipes for more Polish dumplings here). Potato Dumplings with Plums or Knedle ze śliwkami [k-neh-dleh zeh shlee-vkah-me] are doughy and slightly savory dumplings filled with sweet and ripe plums, topped with a butter and bread crumb mixture for some texture and more flavor. There is no sugar added in the recipe. The only sweetness here comes from the plum itself and a bit of sugar sprinkled on top. They are an absolute comfort food for me and the first thing I think of when I see plums in season again.

In Poland, plums are available during the summer only. In season, they are ripe, juicy and soft. They are not picked up until just ready. I did my fair share of plum collecting as a child, as we had a large plum tree in our garden. We’d spread a large tarp underneath the tree, then an adult would shake the branches with a rake until dark purple fruit dropped to the ground. Our job was to collect them into baskets without stepping and crushing “valuable” bounty. Soon after, jars would be filled with plum butter, and we’d have plenty of delicious summer fruit cake to enjoy.

Knedle were always made for dinner in my home. Topped with bread crumbs and butter mixture or sometimes with sour cream and a sprinkle of sugar. They are not difficult to make. Follow just a few steps, and you too can enjoy this delicious treat.

And here is the finished product.

Polish Potato Dumplings with Plums {Knedle ze Śliwkami}

Polish Potato Dumplings with Plums {Knedle ze Śliwkami}

  • Yields: 15 dumplings
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 6-7 medium potatoes or 2 c of leftover mashed potatoes
  • 1 c / 125 g of all-purpose flour + a couple of handfuls for folding
  • 2 eggs
  • Pinch of salt
  • About ½ lbs / 250g of ripe plums
  • TOPPING:
  • 3-4 tbsp of bread crumbs
  • 3-4 tbsp of butter

Instructions

  1. If starting with raw potatoes, peel, wash and boil them, then mash and set aside to cool.

  2. In the meantime, wash plums and cut into pieces (about 1 inch / 3 centimeters). Fill a large pot with water, add a pinch of salt and a splash of oil and bring to boil. Turn to low.

  3. Once potatoes have cooled off, place them in a large bowl or a clean surface, add flour, eggs, and salt and fold to form dough. It will get pretty sticky; add a handful or two of flour and fold some more. With your hands, roll into a log about 2 inches / 5 centimeters in diameter, and cut into squares - see photos above. Flatten each square and, with your fingers, form a circle. Place a couple of pieces of cut up plum onto the circle and fold the sides up to close around the fruit. Roll between your palms gently to seal and form an even round ball. Set aside and continue until all dough is filled.

  4. Drop into boiling water (in batches of about 5-6 dumplings) and gently stir water around them to prevent from sticking to the bottom and each other. Boil on medium-low for 3 minutes from the time they float to the top. Water should not be at a full roll. After 3 minutes, remove one and test to make sure the inside of the dumpling is cooked. If so, remove with a strainer and set on a cookie sheet or a large plate.

  5. To prepare the topping, heat a small frying pan on medium-high. To the dry pan, add bread crumbs and toast until lightly brown (watch closely; they will burn fast). Turn heat to low or off and add butter. Mix until butter and bread crumbs combine.

  6. Serve "knedle" warm, covered with bread crumb/butter mixture and a sprinkle of sugar.

I hope you keep cooking and sharing your Polish heritage with friends and family.

Smacznego!

Anna


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9 Comments

  1. my hungarian mother-in-law made a version of these called gumboc. she used the small italian prune plums, pitted, and stuffed with a sugar cube. same dough recipe and cooking method. but, she’d add sugar to the breadcrumb/meleted butter mixture, and roll the dumpling in this. served bu pouring a spoonful of melted butter on top.

  2. If I may make a suggestion on the type of potato to use, stick to starchy, floury potatoes such as Russets. If you use a waxy potato, you’re bound to have difficulty with the consistency of the dough and the possibility the knedel will fall apart while cooking.

  3. this was close to my Moms recipe. she would add cinnamon sugar to the plum before closing the dough. it was a nice sweetness that went well with the slightly salty, buttery toasted breadcrumbs that were poured on top

  4. These are very similar to the fruit dumplings I make. I am 67 and inherited the recipe from my grandmother who learned it from her mother. I make these about once a year. For part of the batch, I use prune plums, or Italian. I also use peaches in another batch. After they are cooked, they are served with butter-browned bread crumbs, sugar, and butter. Leftover dumplings are cut up and fried in butter.

  5. My polish grandmother used to make plum knedle with canned plums off season and left a beautiful memory! These are the first time I had them using fresh ripe plums. I loved them and was very, very simple to make following your recipe and watched your video. My husband who is Sicilian heritage said he never tasted anything like them and just raved about how delicious they were with everybite. I said the dough is very similar to gnocchi, but he still was blown away with the delicate marriage of flavors. He said he now will always think of these dumplings every time he sees a plum . Thank you and can’t wait to try more of your recipes…next will be pierogi!

  6. Would this recipe work with jarred/canned plums?

    I’m in Australia and even when they’re in season the fresh plums here are super blah

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