Polish Drop Noodles {Kluski Kładzione}

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Polish Drop Noodles {Kluski Kładzione}

This is yet another dinner home run in my kitchen. My family loves a simple meal of dumplings and a meat sauce and this couldn’t get any simpler. Kluski kładzione [cloo-ski kwa-dzio-neh] are quickly made of flour, egg and water mixture without any kneading. Most often we eat them as a starch with dinner, but sometimes I drop them straight into a big pot of chicken soup {rosół} on Sunday. They are soft and doughy and they remind me of my childhood home. It’s funny how one can be transported back in time by sense of taste. I was just sitting in my grandma’s kitchen eating them just as soon as they came out of the pot. Love those memories and this is why I go back to cooking traditional dishes.

Polish Drop Noodles {Kluski Kładzione}

Polish Drop Noodles {Kluski Kładzione}

  • Yields: 5-6 servings
  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 30 min

Ingredients

  • 3 cups / 430g of all purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/4 cup / 300 ml of water
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. In a small bowl beat eggs to mix yolks with whites. Place flour in a large mixing bowl, add eggs and salt. Slowly start adding water and beat on low until blended well.*

  2. Fill a large pot with water and bring to boil. Add a couple of tablespoons of salt and a splash of oil to the water.

  3. With a metal spoon form dumplings the size of a walnut or so, and drop into the boiling water by submerging the spoon in the water - see video above. For this recipe, I do it in three batches, not to overcrowd the pot. Once dumplings are dropped, with a wooden spoon gently stir the water to make sure dumplings aren't sticking together.

  4. Turn water to low simmer and boil for 3-4 minutes from the moment they float to the top.

  5. Remove with a hand strainer and place on a colander. Sprinkle with a tiny bit of oil to prevent from sticking, if not serving right away.

Notes

To reheat, saute in butter.

Serve with your favorite meat stew (recipe for my pork stew here, my recipe for stewed chicken here, recipe for my beef stew here) a mushroom sauce (my recipe here) or favorite soup (browse the SOUPS section of my RECIPE INDEX for many Polish soup recipes).

Smacznego!

Anna

I’m using a stand-up mixer with a beater attachment, quick and easy. This is an affiliate link.


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50 Comments

  1. 1 – I love to cook

    2 – My Mom & Dad were from Poland so what we ate was traditional Polish dishes most of the time.

    I am so glad to have found you on Facebook. To see the Polish names and then spelled out phonetically is awesome. I love seeing recipes for dishes we had. Exploring the ones I haven’t had is a bonus.!!

    Thanx so much.!!

  2. Ohhhh…. kluski! I forgot about kluski – my grandma used to make this for us when we were young. I’m making this ASAP! I will put them in one of your soup recipes because that’s what I’ve been making lately. THANK YOU !!!

  3. Anna (my mother’s name) THANK YOU for this recipe! We had rosol every Sunday before the main entrée. I tried to make it, but never could get the right consistency. I am very anxious to make this, and bring back memories of our Sunday dinners. Mom also used the kluski in her potato soup, to me, this is the best soup in the world!

  4. My husband and I are Polish and enjoy making all the Polish goodies. It will be nice to see things we have not tried, but our Babcis made when we were young!

  5. My mother would often make kluski. Always on Thanksgiving when she would make turkey soup. But our favorite would be when she would fry onions with cabbage or sauerkraut, then add the kluski. Fantastic!

  6. Made gołąbki the other day and had some minced beef mixed with rice and garden peas left over so I finely chopped the heart of the cabbage and added that to the mix with a couple of eggs. Formed the mixture into small balls and shallow fried them until thoroughly cooked. My mother used to do this but I cannot remember what she called them as it was over 60 years ago. This is a good way to use leftovers so nothing goes to waste

  7. Thank you for all your recipes. I remember my mom making these for Czernina. I also remember her making them with grated potatoes, I think. So good flied with butter and onions.

  8. Oh my goodness – THANK YOU!!! I didn’t get into cooking until after my grandmother passed, so I never got a chance to learn from her how to make these! I am so grateful – thank you!!!

  9. Literally just looking through your website and saw this recipe and I had this major awesome childhood flashback to these things! Thanks for posting!

  10. I love drop noodles. My mother and both grandmothers made them. I add extra eggs. 3 cup flour and 4 eggs. Just a personal preference.

  11. Such warm fuzzy memories of drop noodles in my Bupsha’s little Australian kitchen… She put them in a chicken broth soup she called Rossue I think… Im making them for my family. 💙💚😘

  12. My mother made these noodles but she mixed the noodles with bacon and maybe some bacon grease. I am not sure. Have you ever heard of this? I think she called the kluski swiatkame–forgive the spelling which is phonetically. Any thoughts? Thank you.

    1. I’m not sure what those could be, could be a regional dish. I can see how this same batter could work with bacon in it. Delicious!!

    2. Yes. My mom did too. But she actually used boczek, which is a fattier type of bacon I guess. Fried that with onions and added it to the kluski. I liked them either that way or with butter.

  13. my family makes these with potatoes instead of flour. served with kielbasa, mushrooms, and either fried onions and sauerkraut or fried cabbage and onions. like a big casserole. then with a little sourcream on top. we always called it potato kluski. sooooooo delicious! thank god i am polish 😊

    1. There are a few other potato dumpling options on my site. I think you’re talking about “kopytka”… check out the PIEROGI AND DUMPLINGS section😊

  14. Just made the kluski. They were perfect. They reminded me of my mother’s Had them with fried cabbage and onion! Thank you for the receipe it was great😃😃👍🏻

  15. I love your site and recipes. You are so pleasant to watch. I have been using more eggs in my pierogi dough than you do and it looks like it is so much more workable. I am a 80 year old man and I love my Polish heritage. I learned most of my recipes from my Gramma. Looking forward to your recipes and how great you go thru each step. Thanks Anna

  16. Best basic dumpling recipe I’ve made, so far – and I’ve made quite a few!!! The others have been “eggy” flavored and more dense, which isn’t bad, but this one is just right 🙂

  17. Love your site Anna! Keep up the GREAT 👍 job!
    Both my parents were Polish and I have a question for you. My father’s Mom Babcia baked her sauerkraut, mushroom and onion pierogies. Whereas my Mom’s Mom Nanny boiled hers. My five brothers and sisters preferred baked each and everytime. It’s been so so many years ago, I want to know what temp to bake them. Any recipe for baked pierogies since dough is not boiled?
    Tremendous THANKS Anna……so thrilled bringing back such delicious memories!

  18. Love your site Anna! Keep up the GREAT 👍 job!
    Both my parents were Polish and I have a question for you. My father’s Mom Babcia baked her sauerkraut, mushroom and onion pierogies. Whereas my Mom’s Mom Nanny boiled hers. My five brothers and sisters preferred baked each and everytime. It’s been so so many years ago, I want to know what temp to bake them. Any recipe for baked pierogies since dough is not boiled?
    Tremendous THANKS Anna……so thrilled bringing back such delicious memories!

  19. My mother was born in the US to parents who had been refugees from Russian-Occupied Poland (prior to WWI). We often had kluski, and I still make it frequently.

    Dipping the spoon with the dough into the broth is important. But the spoon needs to be dipped first without any dough on it so that the spoon is coated with the soup. The very first kluski will then slide off nicely, and each dip with the dough will also prime the spoon for the next kluski.

    My grown sons now make them for their families. They haven’t yet, though, gotten the hang of the chrusciki I make…as my mother did…each Easter and Christmas Eve.

  20. Hi Anna just found tour site via Pinterest. I am Polish, and both my parents were polish. I was able to visit Poland for the first time in 2018 for 5 days. It was not a long enough visit. I brushed up on the language before going and was able to get around nicely.

    I have looked at some of your recipes and they bring back a lot of good memories. I still do a lot of Polish cooking. When I lived in Cleveland Ohio We had a local Polish supermarket that was family owned & operated. I sure enjoyed going to their market. I will be trying some of your recipes very soon.

    Thanks Ron

  21. My mom taught me how to make these wonderful dumplings! I was pleasantly surprised when I saw the recipe in print. We make baked chicken and serve these dumplings smothered in gravy . We also use them when we do sauerkraut and pork. The dumplings are dropped right in simmering broth. Then sour cream is incorporated. Delish!!!
    Thank you so much.

  22. Anna, Just found you on Pinterest and sign up for your emails. I am Polish and Russian. I have had this food all my life. Even though I married an Italian. I know I will love your recipes. Thank you , Mary

  23. If there are leftover (not often) tomorrow I will fry them up with butter and bread crumbs.

  24. I watch your you tube videos all the time and thoroughly enjoy them. Do you make potato kluski? My mom made them all the time. They were similar to this drop recipe but were made with potatos.

  25. My grndma,uncle and dad made Kluski that they also called sinkersrs because the noodles dropped to the bottom of the pan. However, they then took the sinkers added bacon, onion and bacon grease to them in another pan that formed a gray colored thick gravy like substance that we ate as a regular meal. It was delicious but we have lost the recipe. Has anyone else had kluski this way. I believe my grandparents were from eastern Poland close to the Russian border.

  26. My grandma, uncle and dad used to make m kluski which they also called sinkers because the noodles sunk to the bottom of the pan. However, they continued the process by putting the sinkers in another pan and then added bacon, onion and bacon grease that cause a gray colored gravy to form in the mixture. This was then served as a meal and it was delicious. Since they have died we have lost the actual recipe. Has anyone else had kluski this way? My grand parents were from eastern Poland along the Russian border.

  27. Funny, we’ve been making these for generations in my family… we call them snifflers! I’m still researching my family tree but these definitely came from my grandmothers side of the family ❤️

  28. Love these. We always ate them with browned butter and farmer’s cheese….so good. Thank you for the recipes.

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